Being Probed for phpMyAdmin ?

In Secure Your Linux Host – Part 1 I recommended using Log Watch to keep an eye on what may be happening with your host. Well, today’s review of my own Log Watch indicates that I am being probed for phpMyAdmin. (Someone wants to abuse my database…)

Here is a sample from the log:

401 Unauthorized
/admin/mysql/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/php-my-admin/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/php-myadmin/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.2.3/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.2.6/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.1/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.4/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.5-pl1/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.5-rc1/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.5-rc2/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.5/main.php: 1 Time(s)
/admin/phpMyAdmin-2.5.6-rc1/main.php: 1 Time(s)

Now I have seen activity like this before, but I thought this provided a good example of the increased awareness that scanning through the Log Watch report can provide.

This also provides some solid data in support of having some other controls in place if you are in fact running phpMyAdmin (or even MySQL). Most of the time the passwords that are used to access the content of databases are not used by humans – they are stored in the properties files of the applications that are using the database.

Ok, So Your Logs are Letting You Know What is Being Probed, Now What ?

This awareness allows you to make sure that you are adequately protecting that which is being attacked.  In this case, I already have controls in place to manage this risk. Let’s discuss them.

Lock Down Web Access to Administrative Tools

phpMyAdmin (usually) requires a password (more on that in a second), but you can also add an additional layer of security to your web-based administrative services by adding authentication at the http server itself.

Apache has a nice tutorial: Authentication, Authorization and Access Control

If you run web-based administrative tools, you may wish to lock down the web paths that contain them. In addition to providing a first line of defense, this will reduce the information available to attackers during the reconnaissance portion of their attacks.

If you lock down “mywebsite.com/admin” as described in the Apache How-To above, and you have additional directories under this “mywebsite.com/admin/phpMyAdmin” and “mywebsite.com/admin/keys2Kingdom” , they will not be visible to the attacker (until they guess the password…).

Confirm Strong Passwords

Functional IDs (also called service accounts) are used for application to application (e.g. wordpress to MySQL) authentication, and are (and should be) only handled by humans during installation and maintenance activities. Functional IDs should be long, very random, and not contain words or memorable substrings. (Functional accounts often do not have password retry limits, which heightens the importance of the strength of the password.)

I sometimes use the GRC Strong Password Generator (ah yeah, my ow site gotentropy.artofinfosec.com is down right now…). You can also generate strong passwords using openSSL from the Linux command line:

openssl rand -base64 60

In both cases I prefer to cut and paste a long substring of 40 to 50 characters  (dropping a few characters off both ends, especially the “==” base64 termination marker from the openssl command), and then adding a few characters of my own.

Now, I would never expect an application user to type a 40+ character password. But for a Functional ID – why not ? The root MySql and all db user’s ID should be very complex and long, especially if the host is internet accessible. (If you are using phpMyAdmin, it has a very good password generator included in the “Add User” functionality.)

We will be discussing other ways to protect password based systems from remote attacks in “Secure Your Linux Host – Part 2″… Out soon…

Cheers, Erik

( Part of the Secure Your Linux Host series…)

Advertisements