AoIS Interviews Heather Deem, Part 1

The Art of Information Security has the great pleasure of interviewing Heather Deem. Heather  is the driving force behind Candesco Marketing, and has extensive experience developing and executing marketing programs for Information Security firms. Given the current economy, Art of Information Security felt that there might be broad interest in Heather’s ideas and insights in marketing Information Security products and services.

For more than ten years, Heather has supported marketing efforts, from framing the strategy to executing on the fine details, for a wide range of technology companies including Websense, Finjan, MarkMonitor, F-Secure, and others. I met her at last year’s RSA conference at one of the networking events, and really appreciate her taking the time for the interview. Let’s jump right in…

Erik: How much of a corporation’s resources and energy (capital, time, etc.) should be reserved for marketing?

Heather:  Many companies underestimate the hours and timelines required for campaigns and programs.  Timelines of course vary depending on a company’s goals, budget, the team’s availability, and turn-around times, but in general, it is advisable to allow the following timelines:

Collateral Development: 3-4 weeks to develop a new datasheet, 1-2 weeks for datasheet revision, 4 weeks to develop a new presentation, and 2-3 months to gain customer approval and develop a case study.

Tradeshows: Reserve booth space about a year in advance in order to acquire the best booth location.  Begin planning 4-6 months prior to the event date.  Start development of booth messaging, collateral, and demonstrations at least 3-4 months prior to the show.  Direct mail campaigns, exhibitor service orders, logo’d giveaways, and advanced shipments should be completed about one month prior to the event.

Online Demand Generation Programs: The first step in planning your demand generation program is to define the target market and the offer.  Is the call to action going to be a whitepaper, webinar, podcast or other?  Creation of a new whitepaper can take 2-4 months; 2 months if outsourcing, 4 or more if using internal sources to develop.  For a webinar, you need lead time to engage and schedule your guest speaker, usually an analyst or customer.  Once the target market has been determined and the development of the offer has started, you need to identify the right media company for promotions. Most media sites typically require insertion orders to be placed 2-3 months out.  While some advertising sites have availability 1-3 weeks out, sites with reputable performance typically sell out key promotional categories or banner spots several months out.

Direct Mail Campaigns: Similar to the online programs above, you need to identify your target audience and offer, but will also need to determine the direct mail list for your campaign.  You may have a solid customer and prospect database for your targeted mailing or you may opt to rent or purchase a 3rd party mailing list.  In both cases, you should take the time to segment the list to the specific contact titles, verticals, or geographic areas which are most relevant to your targeted audience.  It is also worthwhile, especially if utilizing a 3rd party list, to confirm the contact information and the mailing address of each recipient.  Depending on the size and quality of your list, the process of scrubbing the list may take days or several weeks. This step is less necessary if you are mailing an inexpensive post-card, but quite necessary if you have developed a higher quality mail piece or offer.

Depending on your offer and the complexity of your direct mail piece, it may take 2 weeks to 1 month to develop content, design the graphical layout, and print the direct mail piece. You will need to allocate another 2-3 weeks for mailing house services and delivery.

The above examples illustrate very rough timelines, but hopefully provide a baseline for planning typical marketing projects. While I’ve worked on and successfully delivered similar projects within shorter timeframes, it is advisable to integrate ample timelines into your project planning to avoid rush fees, team pressure, and depletion of resources which may be needed for other team projects/goals.

Erik: What are the top marketing activities that every organization should make happen?

Heather:  Development of a Marketing Strategy & Plan, and Development of Marketing Materials & Tools.

While this advice sounds almost too simplistic to relay, I cannot tell you how many companies tend to overlook or half-bake their marketing strategy or plan, yet have high expectations of marketing activities which have been based on undefined goals and limited budgets.

Strategy: Identify your target market and develop your positioning, messaging, go-to-market plan, and marketing goals as these elements will serve as a tool for making informed decisions and will be the foundation for your marketing plan and materials.  Ensure that key decision-makers from executives to sales are aligned on these areas.  For example, based on the revenue goals, how many raw leads does marketing need to produce each quarter to support sales, and conversely, does sales have enough resources to appropriately handle follow-up for this volume of leads?

Plan: Based off the marketing strategy and goals, develop the tactical plan to meet the marketing objectives. This plan should include an estimated timeline and campaign results.  Identify if the allocated budget and resources will sufficiently meet the marketing goals.  If not, additional investments in marketing may be required, or the marketing goals may need to be readjusted.

Some companies may feel overwhelmed, not know where to start, or feel that their limited marketing funds don’t justify a full-blown marketing strategy or plan; however, in start-ups, where ever dollar and hour counts, planning is even more crucial as there is less margin for error or waste. Advance planning will strengthen the management of marketing by helping you stay goal-focused, adequately allocate resources, avoid spikes and dips in lead generation, and reduce gaps in your marketing materials.

Marketing Materials: This is one area that deserves more scrutiny. Organizations tend to focus more on lead generation and creating awareness, overlooking or undervaluing the necessity of creating and maintaining a proper marketing library of collateral and tools.  Frequent development and updating of marketing materials is vital to supporting the sales team and channel partners, and for propelling your prospects and customers through the sales cycle.

Almost every company has a datasheet, sales presentation ,and whitepaper, but many overlook other essential marketing materials like positioning briefs for the sales and channel team, ROI calculators, customer case studies, flash demos, and frequent development of new industry whitepapers or webcasts. These tools are like the oil that keeps the sales and marketing engines running smoothly and helps transport prospects through the sales cycle.

Look for Part 2

The second part of this interview with Heather will be posted in a few days. Stay tuned…

Cheers, Erik

 


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